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Selection Sunday demands Craft Brew and Cupcakes

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There was Beer and Cupcakes at Market Garden Brewery on Sunday, March 11. We had a rockin’ time. Here are the notes. I sat with Andy Tveekrem to get information about his beers. If any of these notes are incorrect – this is my fault – and not his.

The Ohio City Room

Friar Power Belgian Tripel with a Saffron and orange cake, topped with Cardamom icing.

This strong light golden ale is the product of belgian history. Originally produced by monks – they developed the distinctive yeast that gives the belgian tripel its ester profile. (Volatile flavor compound naturally created in fermentation. Often fruity, flowery or spicy.) At 8%, the alcohol can sneak up on you. This is Andy’s stealth beer.

The profile of this beer – very floral, slightly bitter, with a lovely citrus kick is paired with the complementary subtle flavors of saffron and cardamom – with a little orange to draw out the citrus.

Pearl Street Wheat with an Almond cake, topped with lemon/orange icing.

The phenolics (Flavor and aroma of smoke, or cloves; caused by wild yeast or bacteria) from the yeasts in this Hefeweisen are nutmeg and clove. Its slightly tart or acidic – the banana nose is characteristic of the yeasts as well. The beer is brewed with about a 65% wheat base in addition to malted barley. This makes for a sweeter beer – but lower alchohol than the first, coming in at 5.5%.

We are pairing this one with almond – in complement to the banana (think banana bread) and the lemon/orange icing is a nod to the tradition of serving this beer with a lemon or orange slice.

Boss Amber Lager with a roasted garlic cake and sundried tomato icing.

Possibly the beer from Market Garden that is most suited for food due to the toasted malt. This one would pair with any roasted meat dish. Its fermented colder and slower than ales – for about six weeks. Andy utilizes a Vienna Malt for this traditional Vienna Lager. A great Session beer, it comes in at 5% – a perfect example of how to make a good lager. This is probably my favorite.

Obviously the roasted garlic and sundried tomato come together to give you a sweet treat reminiscent of your Sunday dinner of roast chicken – without trying to create a meat cupcake!

 

 

This beer is named after Andy – the “Striking Viking” – an American Pale Ale produced with Cascade hops and English yeasts. These yeast typically produce a butter or butterscotch flavor. And he uses a crystal malt for color and body. This one comes in at 5.5% – another easy drinker.

We bring creaminess to this pairing with white chocolate to sooth the hops, and bacon and jalapeno demonstrate an easy pairing with burgers or spicy foods.

Wallace Tavern Scotch Ale with a Five Flavor Cake and Salted Caramel icing.

This beer is named for George Wallace, a Scottish settler to Cleveland from 1806. He owned a Distillery and brewery in the area, and later moved to Brandywine. So this is an homage to Cleveland’s beer history. This ale’s malts are actively caramelized utilizing a prolonged boil. The strong heavy malt is balanced by the addition of other flavors to reduce bitterness. Typically the Scots would use heather or other wild ingredients, though Andy doesn’t hold THAT closely to the tradition. He utilizes a slightly higher alcohol percentage (between 6.5 and 7% depending on the batch) to balance the malt – so that the caramel becomes noticeable in the flavor and neutralizes much of the bitterness.

The obvious pairing on this beer is salted caramel, one of my favorite flavors – we added in the five flavor cake to show the diversity of pairing possibilities. A traditional southern dessert, this has lemon, butter, rum, coconut and vanilla in the cake. Any rich saucy dish would pair up nicely with the Wallace Tavern.

Forest City Brown Ale with a nutty carrot cake and cream cheese icing.

This beer is named after Cleveland’s moniker – back when it was all about the lumber here. This brown ale is born from the roasted flavors of a coffee malt which literally can be roasted like coffee beans, providing the brewmaster with differing degrees of flavor to work with. This English style beer is bold and expressive, coming in at 5.8% – and is Andy’s favorite.

When I first tasted this beer, all I could think about was roasted vegetables. Pair this one up with any roasted veg – like a lasagna. The pasta will sooth the bitterness on the finish. We give you a nutty carrot cake with cream cheese to attain the desired affect.

A Cookie and a Cupcake made these incredible treats. Visit them in Tremont. 

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2 responses »

  1. Sounds like great pairings. Hope it was a success! My only comment? Hefeweizen

    Reply

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